Here’s what we do know: The keto diet may be useful in treating symptoms of epilepsy, a seizure disorder. “The use of keto in treating epilepsy has the most evidence,” Angelone says. One study conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine, for example, followed epileptic patients on the keto diet and found that 36 percent of them had a 50 percent reduction in seizures after three months on the diet, and 16 percent were seizure-free. However, experts aren't entirely sure why the keto diet has this affect, she adds.
Taking an exogenous ketone supplement, such as Perfect Keto can also help reduce keto flu symptoms. Exogenous ketones help fight fatigue and boost energy levels by raising the ketone levels in your blood. To be clear, ketone supplements aren’t a replacement for the keto diet, but they can help you stay in ketosis when you’re meeting your macros, and provide all day energy.
Has adding more water, salt and fat not helped very much? Are you still feeling achy, tired and off? We recommend you try to endure it for a few more days until the symptoms pass. Research has shown that a very-low-carb diet is best for weight loss and metabolic issues like type 2 diabetes.Keto flu symptoms are only temporary – they’ll be long gone when you are a fat burner.
What can you drink on a ketogenic diet? Water is the perfect drink, and coffee or tea are fine too. Ideally, use no sweeteners, especially sugar. A splash of milk or cream in your coffee or tea is OK, but beware that the carbs can add up if you drink multiple cups in a day (and definitely avoid caffe lattes!). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.
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